How Not To Design an Expensive Website that Probably Won’t Work Anyway

by Joanne Steele on September 11, 2012

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I’m trying very hard to focus my energies here on rural tourism and rural development, with the nuts and bolts of internet marketing handled over at Take Control of Your Internet Marketing.sexy web design

But you, my regular readers are here, and this is too important to miss:  I ran into an important article today, Principles of User Interface Design that many of you probably missed. For most of you, it’s not something that jumps out as a “must read.” (That’s why you subscribe here, to get me to find these gems and save you time.)

Read the whole thing if you like. But the gist is perfectly simple:

For your website design, Simple is Best still rules

Internet technology has advanced to the point where anything is possible in your website design.

  • Images can move.
  • Video can start as soon as someone arrives.
  • Like and Share buttons can follow you around the screen or darken the whole screen, demanding that you do something in order to be able to continue to read.
  • Photos can be stuffed anywhere.
  • Sidebars can contain all kinds of visually distracting stuff.

The points made in the post by Joshua Porter is that all these options won’t necessarily help you achieve your goal on a business website, which is to sell your products and services and connect with your customer.

Why?

Because our human brains are evolving and changing at a slower rate than technology is dishing out new ways to serve up information!

We simply can’t process all the visual and auditory stimulation these new bells and whistles provide. So what do we do? We ignore them.

Our eyes dance around a page. We skip stuff. We simply don’t see much of what is offered. And finally in confusion, we click away. That “up to date” website with tons expensive technology is no better at doing its job than an old static html website!

I’ve written in the past about multitasking and how poorly our brains are equipped to manage multiple demands on our attention.

Using the points outlined in Joshua Porter’s blog post, you can accomplish your goals for your website without spending a bundle on the latest technology.

What this article is telling us is to go back to the future! Go back to simple. Go back to letting your message and your business goals drive your website design rather than the latest technology.

In Module 3, Taking Control of Your Website over at Take Control of Your Internet Marketing, we teach you how to create your own simple and effective website that will do exactly what you need it to do, to help you sell your products and services and connect with your customer.

If you already have a website it can help you improve it. If you have an old one that needs a facelift, it will show you how to give it one. If you’ve been putting off creating a website, it will walk you through the steps you need to take to build one.

Creating an effective business website is inexpensive and completely doable. Join Take Control, and let’s get started together, improving your internet marketing.

 

Photo on Flickr by Jake Przespo

 

1 Kenneth Hoback September 16, 2012 at 3:57 pm

My wife (Lareda) and I enjoy receiving your e-mails. We meet with you at a conference with Kathie Starkweather and several other people. Kathie is helping our Loup Rivers Scenic Byway a grant to start a butterfly gardens along the byway. We want to get our young involved in this projects. The hope is get people from other area of our country to visit our beautiful Sandhills. The Byway was donated some land to be used for tourism in Burwell. There are plans in works to have a butterfly conservatory build in Burwell, Ne. If you are in the Burwell area you can have free stay with us.
Kenneth & Lareda Hoback
46368 Hiway 91
Burwell, Ne. 68823
308-346-4366
autumnleafbb@yahoo.com

2 Joanne Steele September 17, 2012 at 11:05 am

So nice to hear from you! You and Lareda are a real inspiration. If every rural area had people as dedicated and relentless in pursuing a vision for their area, rural communities would be flourishing! Thanks for the update.

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